Comments of the National Research Center for Women & Families and the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund on FDA Safety and Innovation Act Section 907 Report

The National Research Center for Women & Families strongly supports the requirement of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) for an action plan to include demographic subgroups in clinical trials and data analysis. Greater diversity in clinical trials, analyzing subgroup data, and reporting the results and explaining the implications in product labels and MedGuides will shed light on which medical products are safe and effective for which demographic subgroups, including racial and ethnic minorities. Continue reading

Members of the Patient, Consumer, and Public Health Coalition support the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and oppose efforts to repeal the 2.3% excise tax on medical devices

September 26, 2013. As members of the Patient, Consumer, and Public Health Coalition, we strongly support the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and oppose efforts to undermine this essential program that will benefit millions of Americans. In the upcoming negotiations over the budget and debt ceiling, we urge you to reject the repeal of the 2.3% excise tax on medical devices. Continue reading

Letter to the CA Bureau of Electronic and Appliance Repair, Home Furnishings and Thermal Insulation, in Support of the Proposed Modified Flammability Standards for Upholstered Furniture

As a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving public health, the National Research Center for Women & Families strongly supports the proposed revisions of California’s flammability standards for upholstered furniture and other products. Continue reading

Choosing Wisely: Medical Tests You Probably Don’t Need

Consumer Reports and the ABIM Foundation are working with medical specialty societies to create lists of “5 Things Physicians and Patients Should Question” as part of a national campaign called Choosing Wisely (www.choosingwisely.org). Here is their list of tests that are given too often, including recommendations about when they are most likely to be useful or necessary. Continue reading