Testimony of Dr Jennifer Yttri, senior fellow, at FDA Advisory Committee on reclassification of blood lancets

Blood lancets, used to test blood sugar levels in diabetics or to obtain blood samples from finger pricks, have been considered a low risk medical device, like band-aids. However, FDA and CDC have found that blood lancets being used on multiple patients have resulted in increasing numbers of hepatitis outbreaks. In a statement to the FDA, NRC made the claim that blood lancets are medium and high risk devices, that require more regulation than low risk devices. Continue reading

Testimony of Dr Jennifer Yttri, senior fellow, at FDA Advisory Committee on sorbent hemoperfusion systems

These systems are used to filter toxins out of the blood . However, there is not proof that the devices save the lives of patients who are poisoned, have a drug overdose, or are in a coma from liver failure. Because of this lack of evidence, Dr Yttri and the NRC argued that these devices need to undergo clinical testing. Continue reading

Testimony of Dr Jennifer Yttri, senior fellow, at FDA Advisory Committee on implanted blood access devices

FDA wanted to change implanted blood access devices, like catheters and cannulas, from a Class III device (highest standards) to a Class II device (lower standards). Senior fellow, Jennifer Yttri, spoke on behalf of NRC about how reclassification would limit the ability of FDA and patients to request more safety and efficacy testing and remove faulty devices from market. Continue reading

Comments on Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Automated External Defibrillator System

June 24, 2013. As members of the Patient, Consumer, and Public Health Coalition, we strongly support the FDA proposed order that will require the premarket approval application (PMA) for Automated External Defibrillators systems (AEDs). However, we oppose the FDA exercising an enforcement discretion that would allow 510(k) cleared AEDs to remain on the market for 15 months after FDA issues a final order requiring a PMA for these devices. Continue reading

Testimony of Caitlin Kennedy, senior fellow, on nonthermal shortwave diathermy devices classification, FDA Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee

Testimony of Caitlin Kennedy, senior fellow, on nonthermal shortwave diathermy devices classification, FDA Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee, on May 21, 2013 Continue reading

Testimony of Dr. Jennifer Yttri on pedicle screw spinal systems FDA Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee

Pedicle screw systems are used to stabilize the spines of patients who need spinal fusions to correct spine injuries, deformations, or degeneration. Dr. Yttri pointed out the lack of clear clinical evidence that pedicle screw systems are beneficial for patients and how the FDA should require clinical testing before approving new devices. Continue reading

Comments to the FDA on “Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis”

The National Research Center for Women & Families and the TMJ Association oppose the reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle prosthesis, a preamendments class III device, into class II. The proposed special controls are not rigorous enough to provide a reasonable assurance of the device’s safety and effectiveness. Continue reading

Comments on Proposed Order Regarding Transilluminator for Breast Evaluation

May 6, 2013. As members of the Patient, Consumer, and Public Health Coalition, we strongly support the FDA requiring the premarket approval (PMA) process for Transilluminator for breast evaluation devices because they pose substantial risks and the benefits of these devices are “unknown” and there is “limited scientific evidence” regarding their effectiveness. Continue reading

Comments on Proposed Order Regarding Sorbent Hemoperfusion Devices

May 6, 2013. As members of the Patient, Consumer, and Public Health Coalition, we strongly support the FDA requiring the premarket approval (PMA) process for sorbent hemoperfusion devices because they pose substantial risks and the benefits of these devices are “unknown” and there is “limited scientific evidence” regarding their effectiveness.[1] We strongly oppose down- classifying the devices for the treatment of poisoning and drug overdose. Continue reading