Medical Device Recalls and the FDA Approval Process

February 14, 2011. Unlike prescription drugs, medical devices are reviewed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) using 2 alternative regulatory standards: (1) premarket approval (PMA), which requires clinical testing and inspections; or (2) the 510(k) process, which requires that the device be similar to a device already marketed (predicate device). The second standard is intended for devices that the FDA deems to involve low or moderate risk. Continue reading

New Study Shows that Most Medical Devices Recalled for Life-Threatening Problems Were Not Tested on Patients

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: 4 P.M. (EST), MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2011. A new study released today finds that most medical devices recalled during the last five years for “serious health problems or death” were originally cleared (approved) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) using a less stringent process that does not require testing in patients. The study, released on-line prior to publication in the Archives of Internal Medicine, was co-authored by Dr. Diana Zuckerman and Paul Brown of the National Research Center for Women & Families and Dr. Steven Nissen, Chairman of the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. Continue reading