BPA-Free Baby Bottles Now Law, But We’re Not in the Clear

Huffington Post, August 14, 2012. I asked Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Research Center for Women and Families if she was concerned about the substitutes being used in place of BPA: “We are very concerned that BPA could be replaced with products that are just as risky, or even more risky. The federal government is not doing what is needed to protect the American public, either in their regulation of BPA or any of these potential substitutes.” Continue reading

Essure Study Criticized

NBC News, November 4, 2013. Dr. Diana Zuckerman, who leads the National Research Center for Women and Families, a non-partisan FDA watchdog, said the survey questionnaires exhibit dubious research methods. “These studies are always done by the company that is selling the product so it is not exactly unbiased,” Zuckerman said. Continue reading

Lawsuits pile up over popular birth control pill

Chicago Tribune. September 15, 2013. Birth control pills containing drospirenone “shouldn’t be on the market because there are so many safer alternatives,” said Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Research Center for Women & Families. “We can debate how unsafe it is and for whom — more research could obviously clarify that — but there’s really no doubt that it’s not as safe as dozens of other birth control pills.” Continue reading

Letter to the editor: Still working to understand cancer

The Post article on the overdiagnosis of cancer clearly reported the need to reduce patients’ fear and confusion about “cancers” that many experts now agree are not really cancer, because they don’t spread and aren’t harmful. The major obstacle has been uncertainty about how likely these conditions are to predict cancer or change into an invasive cancer in the future. Continue reading

FDA Kicks Off Women’s Health Program With Surgical Mesh Registry

FDA’s launch of a new registry for controversial surgical transvaginal mesh products as part of a new program focusing on women’s health could signal the agency is planning to prioritize sex-specific device concerns, a consumer advocate said. “If they start with new patients, it will take years before we get the information that we need,” said Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Research Center for Women & Families. Continue reading