A Cure for Peanut Allergies?

Food allergies are on the rise, making school, traveling, and even birthday parties risky business for many children. However, there might be a cure: in a 2014 study of Oral Immunotherapy treatment (OIT), over 80% of participants were able to eat the equivalent of about five peanuts after OIT. Continue reading

6 Things You Need to Know About Juicing Your Veggies

There is no question that eating your vegetables is good for your health, but what about drinking them? Juicing vegetables is one of the latest health trends, so here’s what you need to know about adding fresh juices to your diet. Continue reading

Which medications, tests, and treatments should you really get? Recommendations for “Choosing Wisely”

When it comes to our health we often want to know as much as possible. But sometimes there is just too much information on what to do to stay healthy. Continue reading

How Do You Recover From Rape?

After being sexually assaulted, it can be difficult to know where to turn for help. Several studies suggest that group therapy is more effective at reducing PTSD, anxiety, and depression than individual therapy. However, group therapy may not be the best choice for everyone. Find out what other forms of therapy are available so you can decide what is right for you or a loved one. Continue reading

“Why Doesn’t She Just Leave?” Barriers to Getting Out of Abusive Relationships

Domestic violence is a fact of life in the U.S. for approximately 35% of women and 28% of men. When we learn someone is in an abusive relationship, the first question many people ask is “Well, why doesn’t she just leave?” However, getting out of the situation is not as easy as people like to think. Continue reading

Are Bisphenol A (BPA) Plastic Products Safe?

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical used to make plastics. It is frequently used in sports equipment, water bottles, medical devices, as a coating or lining in food and beverage cans, and in credit card receipts. It leaches out of plastic into liquids and foods, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found measurable amounts of BPA in the bodies of 93% of the U.S. population studied. While early concerns about BPA’s health effects were based primarily on animal studies and research on cells, there is increasing evidence from studies in humans that BPA can cause serious harm, such as increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and sexual dysfunction. Continue reading

Aspirin: Could It Reduce Your Risk for Cancer?

Often called a “wonder drug,” aspirin reduces aches and pains, fever, and swelling, and lowers the risk of heart attack and stroke. Low dose aspirin is used as an inexpensive drug to prevent heart attacks and strokes in patients that have had previous attacks or have coronary artery disease. More recent research suggests it might also lower our chances of developing several types of cancer, and help keep cancer from spreading. Continue reading

Social Networking Sites: Benefits, Problems, and “Facebook Depression”

For better or worse, social networking is an almost unavoidable part of everyday life. The number of people joining social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google Plus is growing exponentially, especially among youth. Due to the prevalence of social media usage among youths, many parents wonder if it is having beneficial or negative effects on their children. Like many things in life, the answer is not so clear-cut: it’s yes and no. Facebook both promotes mental well-being and undermines it. Continue reading

The Failed Promise of Gene Based Tests for Diagnosing and Treating Cancer

When the Human Genome Project released its first “draft” in 2000, many scientists believed it would revolutionize medical research. President Bill Clinton claimed that genetic diagnosis (the ability to tell who has a disease after looking at the genes) would “revolutionize the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of most, if not all, human diseases.”Although the ability to map the human genome has great promise, a decade later it still hasn’t yielded good methods for diagnosing cancer. Even more disappointing: recent scandals and severe product flaws have cast doubt on gene-based research as a whole Continue reading

Procrit, Aranesp, and Epogen–All Risk and No Benefits for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease?

Anemia drugs are widely used by patients on chemotherapy and patients with chronic kidney disease, but there is growing evidence that the misuse of these drugs is harming many patients. The FDA issued a “safety communication” on June 24, 2011 recommending lower doses of anemia drugs for patients with chronic kidney disease. This warning was based on studies showing increased risk of stroke, blood clots, other cardiac problems, and death for patients with chronic kidney disease Continue reading

Getting Up on the Wrong Side of the Bed: Sleepiness, Behavior Problems, and Obesity in Children and Teens

Sleep is essential for the renewal and restoration of the body. But is your child getting enough? Research indicates that children who do not get the recommended 10 to 12 hours of sleep per night may be more likely to have conduct problems at home and in the classroom, as well as suffer from many health problems now and in the future. Continue reading

Can Cleanliness Increase The Risk of Allergies and Asthma?

Is being too clean bad for your health? Research indicates that some of the products we use to avoid germs may contribute to the development of conditions like asthma and allergies. Continue reading

Danger at the Dentist’s (and Orthodontist’s) Office: Children Exposed to Radiation

Has your child been to the orthodontist this year? Was he or she exposed to dangerous levels of radiation? More and more dentists and orthodontists are using an imaging device that delivers significantly higher doses of radiation than regular X-rays. While the machine’s promoters claim that this technology is a safe way to obtain highly detailed images of a patient’s mouth and skull, other health experts are concerned about the cumulative effects of radiation from these scans, and think they shouldn’t be used routinely. Continue reading

Seroquel, Abilify, Zyprexa, and Risperdal are Widely Used But With Dangerous Side Effects

For patients who suffer from depression or anxiety, it’s hard to know which medication is best. It seems everyday a new “wonder drug” is introduced, often costing 10 or 20 times as much as older medications. Things become even more confusing when doctors prescribe medications “off label.” One example is Seroquel. Not approved to specifically treat depression or anxiety, of what kinds of dangers should one be aware? Continue reading

ADHD Treatment: Medications and Alternatives

The use of stimulant medications to treat attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) steadily increased in the United States from 1991 to 1999. Though the medications are shown to be effective in 70-80% of children with ADHD, the skyrocketing use of these drugs is worrisome, given the cardiovascular risks that have recently come to light. As such, what are the alternatives, and what does this mean for your child? Continue reading